From Our Facebook: 


Every week is Library Week at the Escondido Public Library. Lives Change @ Your Library!
 
Farida and her 4 year old son, Abdeali, take advantage of every program and service that the Library has to offer from checking out free San Diego Children’s Discovery Museum passes to participating in storytime events that help prepare Abdeali for kindergarten. Allowing him to use the self-checkout machine without help from mom gives him a sense of independence and accomplishment, and he’s already starting to pick up some chess skills just by watching the older kids play.
From Our Facebook:

Every week is Library Week at the Escondido Public Library. Lives Change @ Your Library!

Farida and her 4 year old son, Abdeali, take advantage of every program and service that the Library has to offer from checking out free San Diego Children’s Discovery Museum passes to participating in storytime events that help prepare Abdeali for kindergarten. Allowing him to use the self-checkout machine without help from mom gives him a sense of independence and accomplishment, and he’s already starting to pick up some chess skills just by watching the older kids play.

pickeringtonlibrary:

oskaloosalibrary:

“Even the strongest and bravest must sometimes weep. It shows they have a great heart, one that can feel compassion for others.”
- Brian Jacques,  Redwall 

A highly underrated author.  Brian Jacques Redwall series is a masterpiece of storytelling, plotting, and characterization.  Tales of good and evil, friendship, love, honor, loyalty, and justice.  Exquisite world-building and detailing, clever dialogue, details you can practically feel jump off the page.
You want fantasy?  You want good fantasy?  You want books that will leave you cheering and crying and needing the next book faster than we can get it into your hands?  Read Brian Jacques.

pickeringtonlibrary:

oskaloosalibrary:

“Even the strongest and bravest must sometimes weep. It shows they have a great heart, one that can feel compassion for others.”

Brian Jacques, Redwall

A highly underrated author.  Brian Jacques Redwall series is a masterpiece of storytelling, plotting, and characterization.  Tales of good and evil, friendship, love, honor, loyalty, and justice.  Exquisite world-building and detailing, clever dialogue, details you can practically feel jump off the page.

You want fantasy?  You want good fantasy?  You want books that will leave you cheering and crying and needing the next book faster than we can get it into your hands?  Read Brian Jacques.

schim:

Cats who can’t figure out walls [x]

PLEASE TAKE YOUR CAT TO THE VET IF YOU SEE THEM DOING THIS BEHAVIOR OVER TIME.

It’s called “head pressing” and it occurs in dogs and cats. 

Head pressing is characterized by the compulsive act of pressing the head against a wall or other object for no apparent reason. This generally indicates damage to the nervous system, which may result from a number of varying causes, including prosencephalon disease (in which the forebrain and thalamusparts of the brain are damaged), or toxic poisoning.

http://www.petmd.com/cat/conditions/neurological/c_ct_headpressing

http://www.vet.cornell.edu/FHC/health_resources/toxoplasmosis.cfm (head pressing is listed as a symptom)

http://sevneurology.com/patients/clip-multilobular-osteochondroma (About a dog’s brain tumor but head pressing is listed as a symptom)

(Source: fuckyeahfelines, via bellbobaggins)

Happy Earth Day!
Go Outside and Read!

Happy Earth Day!

Go Outside and Read!

anasaltukhaifi:

Umbrellas Street, Portugal.


Explore Portugal!

anasaltukhaifi:

Umbrellas Street, Portugal.

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Explore Portugal!

(Source: jasmineberryful, via emmyc)

kamiexe:

chicken-fingers:

this movie was way too heavy for its intended age group

it’s actually really perfect for all ages because when kids learn this stuff early in life it stays with them 

.

Enjoy The Iron Giant today!

(Source: sometimes-alice, via viria)

From our Facebook:

Elisa is one of the Library&#8217;s hardworking customer service staff, but she is also a Literacy learner and ambassador. Here is the story of how her life changed @ her library:

&#8220;Literacy has helped me achieve my goals. I have always wanted to be understood by people at work and everyone else. Literacy helped me build confidence, and as a result I was able to apply to become a citizen, and I passed tthe test! I also have received two promotions at work, and I feel more confident talking to my children&#8217;s doctors and teachers. 
Because of the confidence Literacy has given me, I am planning on taking college courses over the summer to get my Library Technology Certificate. Thanks to the Literacy program, I have a better life, and I know my kids will too. I feel like I am a good example for my kids that it is never too late to go back to school.&#8221;
From our Facebook:

Elisa is one of the Library’s hardworking customer service staff, but she is also a Literacy learner and ambassador. Here is the story of how her life changed @ her library:

“Literacy has helped me achieve my goals. I have always wanted to be understood by people at work and everyone else. Literacy helped me build confidence, and as a result I was able to apply to become a citizen, and I passed tthe test! I also have received two promotions at work, and I feel more confident talking to my children’s doctors and teachers. Because of the confidence Literacy has given me, I am planning on taking college courses over the summer to get my Library Technology Certificate. Thanks to the Literacy program, I have a better life, and I know my kids will too. I feel like I am a good example for my kids that it is never too late to go back to school.”

"I began to realize how important it was to be an enthusiast in life. If you are interested in something, no matter what it is, go at it full speed ahead. Embrace it with both arms, hug it, love it and above all become passionate about it. Lukewarm is no good."

— Roald Dahl (via wanduring)

(Source: onlinecounsellingcollege, via felaxx)

coelasquid:

meggan-harukiri:

roachpatrol:

redjeep:

retrogasm:

When they realized women were using their sacks to make clothes for their children, flour mills started using flowered fabric for their sacks. The label was designed to wash out.

1939 Kansas Wheat…

holy #%$&amp; that’s the cutest marketing scheme i’ve ever heard of 
'buy our flour it's going to make the nicest bread and the sweetest dress!’ 
yes thank you ok sold

I see it differently. During the Great Depression, a lot of people couldn’t afford new fabric, let alone new clothes. They used whatever they could get their hands to make clothes for their kids, as we know kids grow out of clothing really fast. Thus they used burlap and flour sacks.
When flour mills noticed this, they didn’t use it as a marketing ploy. Actually, it was more of a gift the flour mills printed the material. They were trying to help the kids look nicer, that they didn’t have to walk around in just flour sacks, but look normal despite the circumstances.
I showed my Grandma this post, and her father used to run a flour mill. She remembers when she was teased for have “sack dresses”, but when her father’s boss began to provide patterned bags, she wasn’t teased that badly.

Preeeetty sure it was more about marketing than “a gift”, stuff like this is usually the result of really heavy duty market probing and brainstorming. It’s kind of like how Cool Whip was intentionally put in containers that could be reused like tupperware to make it more appealing to housewives. Company sells more product, people have a more useful resource, everyone wins.

coelasquid:

meggan-harukiri:

roachpatrol:

redjeep:

retrogasm:

When they realized women were using their sacks to make clothes for their children, flour mills started using flowered fabric for their sacks. The label was designed to wash out.

1939 Kansas Wheat…

holy #%$& that’s the cutest marketing scheme i’ve ever heard of 

'buy our flour it's going to make the nicest bread and the sweetest dress!’ 

yes thank you ok sold

I see it differently. During the Great Depression, a lot of people couldn’t afford new fabric, let alone new clothes. They used whatever they could get their hands to make clothes for their kids, as we know kids grow out of clothing really fast. Thus they used burlap and flour sacks.

When flour mills noticed this, they didn’t use it as a marketing ploy. Actually, it was more of a gift the flour mills printed the material. They were trying to help the kids look nicer, that they didn’t have to walk around in just flour sacks, but look normal despite the circumstances.

I showed my Grandma this post, and her father used to run a flour mill. She remembers when she was teased for have “sack dresses”, but when her father’s boss began to provide patterned bags, she wasn’t teased that badly.

Preeeetty sure it was more about marketing than “a gift”, stuff like this is usually the result of really heavy duty market probing and brainstorming. It’s kind of like how Cool Whip was intentionally put in containers that could be reused like tupperware to make it more appealing to housewives. Company sells more product, people have a more useful resource, everyone wins.